“My teacher training has been an invaluable journey of the self to the self and I feel grounded and able to teach from my authentic heart – I am deeply grateful to all my teachers and clients who help me to grow every day”

Jo is a senior yoga teacher and has been practising yoga for 30 years and teaching since 2008. Originally under the guidance of Barbara Currie and Ruth White at the age of 16 and from that time connected with the power and the beauty of yoga.

Jo’s yoga lineage is T.K.V. Desikachar, the son of Krishnamacharya who developed the method Viniyoga to relieve suffering, re-establish freedom of movement, rebalance and strengthen the physical body, achieve a healthier mind. Small steps to connect to our true and ultimate selves and trust our hearts. Change starts from within.

Jo attended the British Wheel of Yoga foundation course with Sue Aslett and then further trained in London with Dr. Elena Voyce of Teach Yoga, who is a pioneer of therapeutic yoga in the UK and attaining the British Wheel of Yoga accredited teaching diploma. After many hours of teaching yoga, Jo wished to learn more about using yoga as a therapy and attained the Yoga Therapy Teaching Diploma with Yoga Campus.  Jo also has an ITEC diploma in anatomy and physiology and has trained in relax and renew restorative yoga with Judith Hanson Lasater, prana vinyasa with Shiva Rea and mindfulness with Mindfulness UK.

Jo’s teaching style of yoga is fluid and rhythmic with a key focus on exploring and embracing who you are today. Practice with awareness. Listening to your body and find what makes you feel good. Encouraging clients to develop their own yoga aligned to their needs. No judgement, no competition. Real yoga for real bodies.

Jo is a British Wheel of Yoga registered teacher and is also registered with the Complimentary & Natural Healthcare Council as a Yoga Therapist.

Fully insured with British Wheel of Yoga and certified in administering first aid.

Natural light studio photography by Emily W Photography.

“Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured and endure what cannot be cured” – B.K.S Iyengar



Latest Blogs

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We are often striving too hard in our lives to secure success. Driven by our will rather than our heart. Auyervedic philosophy believes we are made up of different doshas and this is our constitution (Prakriti). We are most balanced and achieve the best wellness when we have balance aligned to our Prakriti. During a homework assignment

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Jo Burningham

Nov 24, 2017

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The psoas muscle (pronounced so-as), otherwise known as the the mother muscle because it controls us and it's not only a muscle, as Liz Koch says; "it's the source of your inner power". It connects the upper body with the lower body and it stabilises the pelvis and in some ways helps to perform hip flexion. However, it is now widely accepted that this muscle is a different colour and composition to other muscles in the body and it's primary function is that of a neurological messenger.

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Jo Burningham

Oct 20, 2017

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One of my yogis recently had a surgical procedure deferred due to high blood pressure. Terribly disappointing for him since he's lost weight, reduced his alcohol consumption, is exercising more and has a regular and committed yoga practice. He says that he doesn't feel stressed and his sleep quality is good. The doctor has suggested medication for 'life', however, he wishes to explore breathing and other techniques to reduce his blood pressure naturally. He recently had a massage and was aware that his blood pressure was much improved after the massage. We know that massage helps brings us back to a state of balance - homeostasis -  but what is happening in the body to trigger this coming home to ourselves and the reduction in blood pressure as a result?

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Jo Burningham

Sep 14, 2017